Dashboards as products

In the past few articles I’ve exposed what dashboards are not:

  • an exercise in visual design,
  • an exercise in data visualization technique.

Another way to put this is that “let’s do this just because we can” is a poor mantra when it comes to designing dashboards, or visualizations in the broader sense by the way.

Do it for the users

Now saying that dashboards should be products is a bit tautological. Products, in product design, refer to the result of a holistic process that solves problems of users – a process that includes research, conception, exploration, implementation and testing.

Most importantly, it’s about putting the needs of your users first. And your users first. Interestingly, treating your dashboard as a product means that the dashboard – your product – doesn’t come first.

Creating an awesome dashboard is a paradox. Googling for that phrase yields results such as: 20+ Awesome Dashboard Designs That Will Inspire You25 Innovative Dashboard Concepts and Designs24 beautifully-designed web dashboards that data geeks or 25 Visually Stunning App Dashboard Design Concepts. This is NOT dashboard product design (though it’s a good source of inspiration for visual design of individual charts).

Eventually, no one cares for your dashboard. When designing a dashboard, it’s nice to think that somebody out there will now spend one hour everyday looking at all this information nicely collected and beautifully arranged, but who would want to do that? Who would want to add to their already busy day an extra task, just to look at information the way you decided to organize it? This point of view is a delusion. We must not work accordingly.

Instead, let’s focus on the task at hand. What is something that your users would try to accomplish that could be supported by data and insights?

What is the task at hand?

If you start to think “show something at the weekly meeting” or “make a high-level dashboard” I invite you to go deeper. Show what? a dashboard for what? not for its own sake.

Trickier – how about: “to showcase the data that we have”? That is still not good enough. You shouldn’t start from your data to create your dashboard, and for several reasons. Doing so would limit yourself to the data that you have or which is readily available for you. But maybe that this data, in its raw form, is not going to be relevant or useful to your users. Conversely, you would be tempted to include all the data that you have, but each additional information that you bring to your dashboard would make it harder to digest and eventually detrimental to the process. Most importantly, if you don’t have an idea of what the user would want to accomplish with your data, you cannot prioritize and organize it, which is the whole point of dashboard design.

Finally – “to discover insights” is not a task either. Dashboards are a curated way to present data for a certain purpose. They are not unspecified, multi-purpose analytical exploration tools. In other words: dashboards will answer a specific, already formulated question. And they will answer in the best possible way, if they are designed as such. For exploration, ad-hoc analysis is more efficient, and is probably best left to analysts or data scientists than end users.

Here are some example of tasks:

  • check that things are going ok – that there is no preventable disaster going on somewhere. For instance: website is up – visits follow a predictable pattern.
  • Specifically, check that a process had completed in an expected way. For instance: all payments have been cleared.
  • If something goes wrong, troubleshoot it – find the likely cause. For instance: sales were down for this shop… because we ran out of an important product. Order more to fix the problem, make sure to stock accordingly next time.
  • Support a tactical decision. For instance: here are the sales of the new product, here are the costs. Should we keep on selling it or stop?
  • Decide where to allocate resources. For instance: we launched three variations of a product, one is greatly outperforming the other two, let’s run an ad campaign to promote the winner.
  • Try to better understand a complex system. For instance: user flow between pages can show where users are dropping out or where efficiency gains lie.

This list is by no means limitative. But it’s really useful to start from the problem at hand than just try to create a visual repository for data.

Next, we’ll see how to implement these in the last article: charts assemble!

 

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